Prevent Incontinence After Childbirth
Your Health & Wellbeing

How to Prevent Incontinence After Childbirth: Proven Methods and Tips

by lilia fedyanina on Jan 26, 2024

Worried about developing incontinence after childbirth?

Incontinence is a common issue, affecting more females than males. This can be attributed to the fact that pelvic floor muscles play a key role in supporting the bladder, and during pregnancy and childbirth, these muscles become weakened due to hormonal and anatomical changes. Women who have given birth are at an increased risk of damaging these muscles, as well as the nerves that control the bladder.

Discover proven methods and strategies, such as avoiding episiotomies and proper positioning during delivery, to help reduce the risk.

Preventing Childbirth-Related Incontinence

 - Avoiding episiotomies and letting the baby's head come out naturally can help reduce pelvic injury and incontinence risk.

- Allowing contractions to push baby through birth canal without pushing may decrease incontinence risk more than encouraging pushing.

- Proper mother positioning and lighting allows doctor to best repair injured tissues from childbirth.

- Use of forceps should be discouraged to prevent pelvic injury.

- Cesarean section may help prevent damage for women with large babies, small pelvises, or problematic labors.

The truth about urinary leaks during and after pregnancy

It is not uncommon for women to experience urinary incontinence during pregnancy. As the fetus develops and the uterus expands, the pressure on the bladder increases. Any additional strain, whether from laughter or exercise, can cause urine to be pushed out of the bladder. Studies show that more than one-third of women experience temporary stress incontinence during their first pregnancy, and over three-quarters during subsequent pregnancies.

Fortunately, most women regain full bladder control after delivery as the tissues of the birth canal heal. In fact, only 5% of women still experience stress incontinence a year after delivery.

 Proven methods to reduce the risk of incontinence after childbirth

The Importance of Avoiding Episiotomies 

Avoiding episiotomies can significantly reduce the risk of pelvic injury. Instead, letting the baby's head naturally come out during delivery, while also massaging the perineum, can help stretch and soften the muscles and skin, potentially preventing tearing. 

Research shows that allowing the contractions of the uterus to push the baby through the birth canal, without the mother's pushing, has a significant impact on reducing the risk of pelvic injury. The common practice of encouraging the mother to push as soon as the cervix is fully dilated may not be the best approach. Instead, patience during this stage of delivery may decrease the risk of developing incontinence. 

Proper Positioning and Lighting

Proper positioning of the mother and excellent lighting are essential to ensure the best possible repair of injured tissues and muscles by the doctor. 

A Modern Approach to Cesarean Sections for Better Outcomes

A liberal approach to cesarean section for women who have a large baby, small pelvic bones, a baby whose head is in the wrong position, or who have a prolonged labor may also help to prevent motherly damage. 

 It is essential to find ways to prevent incontinence that results from childbirth, keeping in mind that the health and safety of both mother and child come first.

Debunking the myth: childbirth and incontinence 

Childbirth is a significant event in a woman's life that comes with its own set of concerns. One such concern is whether childbirth inevitably leads to incontinence. However, the good news is that the vast majority of women who give birth do not develop incontinence. In most cases, the body's natural healing process repairs any damage caused during labor.

Childbirth and incontinence : 60% of women experience full resolution within two months

According to statistics, almost half of all women who have had vaginal delivery show immediate recovery in their pelvic muscles' ability to carry messages. Even better, 60% of women will have full resolution within two months. However, some women may not recover 100% of their pre-labor strength, and for them, incontinence and other pelvic issues may develop later in life. It's essential to talk to your healthcare provider if you have any concerns or symptoms to get the support you need.

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